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162 reasons to swing through TN’s ‘Golf Capital’

Beware: Bogeyman-haunted traps lurk fore-biddingly about the greens in Cumberland County. But really that just makes for even more good reasons link up with friends or family and set a course toward the “Golf Capital of Tennessee” as the summer days chip away into fall.

Cumberland County didn’t earn that distinctive nickname for nothing. The nine challenging courses — that’s a total of 162 holes — will test your metal (and wood) against some of the finest, not-so-faraway fairways the Volunteer State has to offer.

Magnificent panoramic views are par for the course in Cumberland County. The spectacular 14th hole at Druid Hills, where on a clear day you can see 40 miles, is but one extraordinary example.

Nestled alluringly amidst the Cumberland Plateau’s lovely scramble of hills, cliffs, crags, forests, valleys and water hazards, Crossville lies about 110 miles east of Nashville. The county seat of Cumberland County, it is just 70 miles west of Knoxville, and less than an hour’s drive from Cookeville.

“Being named the ‘Golf Capital of Tennessee’ was not a case of local officials looking for a catchy moniker,” the Crossville Chamber of Commerce website assures visitors. More than half a million rounds of golf are played in Cumberland County each year, and the number keeps driving higher all the time.

Jeff Houston, director of golf at Fairfield Glade, estimates that somewhere between 175,000 to 190,000 rounds are teed up yearly at the popular retirement-and-resort hamlet 20 miles northeast of Crossville.

Cumberland County lays claim to its title due to the number of courses and their indisputable beauty — combined with the “amount of play during the season,” said Houston. There are five courses at Fairfield Glade alone, and two more in the county, plus another two within Crossville’s city limits, he said.

Many golf-enthusiasts from Middle Tennessee and beyond make yearly pilgrimages to Cumberland County. Goodlettsville’s Lisa Moore has been making an annual trek with three of her golfing girlfriends since 1995.

“We like going to Crossville because it’s close and convenient, and it’s just beautiful up there,” she said. “You kind of get the feeling you’re going home or to a favorite place where you can relax and unwind, and the people who work at the courses you see year after year and are kind of like old friends. They’re very nice and very accommodating.”

Below is a list of area golf destinations and a little background about what makes each course special. For more details about golf in Crossville, call 1-877-GOLF-TN1 or go online to: golfcapitaltenn.com.

Hole 13’s green at Dorchester fits neatly into a majestic hardwood-pine forest.

Dorchester Golf Club at Fairfield Glade
576 Westchester Drive, Crossville
Phone: (931) 484-3709
Website: https://fairfieldglade.net/fairfield-amenities/ (click on golf)

  • Head Pro: Jack Sixkiller, 22 years
  • Year Opened: 1977
  • Yardage from White Tees: 5,817
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: “By today’s standards the course is not long, but the bentgrass greens, narrow tree-lined fairways, strategically placed bunkers and water on six of the 18 golf holes makes Dorchester Golf Club a challenge for even the skilled golfer.” – Jeff Houston, Fairfield Glade golf director for 28 years.

Signature Hole: A par three that plays 30 yards downhill as it drops from tee to pin, lucky Hole 13‘s green is cut out of forest to give a dramatic effect. A creek that borders the rear of the green complex adds further intrigue.

Druid Hills Golf Club at Fairfield Glade
435 Lakeview Drive, Crossville
Phone: (931) 484-3711
Website: https://fairfieldglade.net/fairfield-amenities/ (click on golf)

  • Head Pro: Rag Jones, 17 years
  • Year Opened: 1970
  • Yardage White Tees: 5,827 yards
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: Located on the highest point in Fairfield Glade, Druid Hills provides several 360-degree scenic views of the surrounding mountains.

Signature Hole: A spectacular east-facing vista (where on a clear day you can see 40 miles) added to a beckoning green guarded by a natural rock waterfall makes Hole 14 an unforgettable par 5.

Heatherhurst Golf Club: The Brae Course at Fairfield Glade
Phone: 421 Stonehenge Drive, Crossville
(931) 484-3799
Website: https://fairfieldglade.net/fairfield-amenities/ (click on golf)

Lake Dartmoor’s smooth waters can be rough on wayward approach shots at The Brae’s 10th hole.

  • Head Pro: Jeremy Jones, 14 years
  • Year Opened: Heatherhurst opened in stages. The Brae Course debuted the Mountain Nine in 1988 and the Creek Nine in 1991. The opening date of the Brae Course and Crag Course as a 36-hole facility was May 27, 2000.
  • Yardage from White Tees: 5,980
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: On the front nine, Heatherhurst Brae features a double dogleg par 5 said to be one of the toughest in Tennessee, and the back nine offers three par 3s, three par 4s and three par 5s with undulating fairways and encroaching bunkers.

Signature Hole: Heatherhurst Brae’s Hole 10 is a long par 5 that plays downhill all the way to the green, and Lake Dartmoor will scuttle errant approach shots to the right and rear.

Don’t let the The Crag’s 14th hole beauty distract you because a precision shot is required on the drive.

Heatherhurst Golf Club: The Crag Course at Fairfield Glade
421 Stonehenge Drive, Crossville
(931) 484-3799
Website: fhttps://fairfieldglade.net/fairfield-amenities/ (click on golf)

  • Head Pro: Jeremy Jones, 14 years
  • Year Opened: Heatherhurst opened in stages. The Crag Course debuted the Pine Nine in 1989 and the New Nine in 2000.
  • Yardage from White Tees: 5,564
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: Heatherhurst Crag is player-friendly with tee locations ranging from the most forward tee at 3,600 to the blue tees at 6,200. Bentgrass tees and greens, wide fairways make it great for short hitters and strategically placed bunkers add to the fun.

Signature Hole: If the view doesn’t get you the Hole 17 tee shot will: a short par 4 that offers a dramatic first shot that plays downhill onto a narrow fairway. With Dogwood Branch bordering the left of the fairway and a huge bank and out of bounds guarding the right, a precise drive is required.

Stonehenge’s 14th hole is encircled with score-imperiling splendor.

Stonehenge Golf Course at Fairfield Glade
222 Fairfield Boulevard, Crossville
Phone: (931) 484-3731
Website: https://fairfieldglade.net/fairfield-amenities/ (click on golf)

  • Head Pro: Corey Wade, 10 years
  • Year Opened: 1985
  • Yardage from White Tees: 6,202
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: Stonehenge is proud to feature bentgrass tees, fairways and greens. Natural rock outcroppings come into play on several holes, with a 15-foot layered stone retaining wall running along the left and rear of the downhill par 3 14th hole.

Signature Hole: A dramatic drop from the tee to the green makes Hole 14 a must-see par 3. Lake Dartmoor awaits in the back for a breath-taking view.

Lake Tansi Golf Course
2476 Dunbar Road, Crossville
931-788-3301
Website: www.laketansigolf.com

  • Head Pro: Gavin Darbyshire, 1 year

    Lake Tansi’s 18th hole is a strong finisher.

  • Year Opened: 1958
  • Yardage from White Tees: 6,205
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: Exceptionally pleasant course for a variety of golfers. It provides a very good challenge for better players from the back tees (6,701 yards) and is still very enjoyable and manageable for mid to high handicap golfers from more forward tees.

Signature Hole: The best is saved for last at Lake Tansi. Hole 18 is a par 5 playing slightly uphill and measuring 592 yards from the back tee. The generous fairway bends from right to left along a hillside as it wraps around Lake Hiawatha. The elevated green, which also slopes toward the lake, presents a challenging finishing target.

Bear Trace at Cumberland Mountain
407 Wild Plum Lane, Crossville
Phone: (931) 707-1640
Website: tnstateparks.com/golf/course/bear-trace-at-cumberland-mountain

  • Head Pro: Kelvin Burgin, 6 years
  • Year Opened: 1998
  • Yardage from White Tees: 5,916
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: “The golf course has no homes on it. It’s just you and nature,” says Burgin.

Signature Hole: 7.

Cumberland Cove in Monterey
Owner Sam Hicks
16941 Highway 70 N., Monterey
931-839-3313
Website: facebook.com/cumberlandcove/

River Run Golf Club
1701 Tennessee Ave., Crossville
931-456-4060
Website: facebook.com/RiverRunGolfClub/

Features of the River Run course include its signature Par 3 island green, and it has the longest and shortest holes in Cumberland County.

Plenty more simian imbecility to go around this time too

A three-year running free-speech fiasco is approaching an apex in Washington County, and it befittingly coincides with the 94th anniversary of the legendary Tennessee Scopes Monkey Trial of July 1925.

A former East Tennessee State University student is scheduled July 15 to begin standing trial before a jury in Jonesborough on charges he violated fellow students’ civil rights by donning a gorilla mask and handing out bananas to Black Lives Matter protesters in the school’s free-speech zone.

In September 2016, an 18-year-old first-semester freshman named Tristan Rettke, who is white, was arrested and charged with a seldom used Tennessee statute designed to punish people who attempt to “unlawfully intimidate” others from exercising their constitutional rights

Subsequently released from custody on $10,000 bond, Rettke withdrew from the university shortly thereafter.

During the course of his interactions with the BLM demonstrators in an ETSU campus plaza area outside the university library, the ape-aping Rettke pranced about barefooted in a pair of overalls, dangling bananas from a length of rope, which some protesters said they believed symbolized a noose. Rettke also at times flourished a burlap bag emblazoned with a Confederate flag and a cannabis leaf — and at one point displayed a piece of paper bearing the handwritten words, “Lives Matter.”

Rettke at another point said to the protestors, “I identify as a gorilla.” When asked the purpose of his actions, Rettke said, “I’m out here to support you guys.”

Prior to making contact with Rettke, one of the white ETSU campus police officers observing the scene commented, “He can’t be doing that bullshit.” Later, Rettke was led away by police — whereupon he was unmasked to the hoots, jeers and intimations of potential future reprisals by BLM protestors.

Six months later, a grand jury indicted Rettke on the civil rights charges, as well as two counts of disorderly conduct and disrupting a meeting or procession.

Prosecutors for Tennessee’s First Judicial District claim in their court filings that when asked by police if his intent was to equate black students to subhuman primates, Rettke reportedly stated, “I knew it would invoke that thought process,” and that he “knew they were getting mad.”

The district attorney general’s office argues that Rettke’s behavior during the affair “clearly falls into the areas of expression that are not afforded protection by the First Amendment, specifically, the ‘fighting words’ exception or the ‘incitement to violence’ exception.”

Free Speech Zone Coverage

As luck and justice would have it, much of the ruckus was captured on video, and can be viewed here.

The 9-minute video, shot by ETSU student Thomas Grant Madison, gives a reasonably thorough indication of what happened that day in a designated campus free-speech zone, where students are permitted to gather and express opinions after first obtaining authorization from school administrators.

Spoiler alert: The only person in any apparent imminent danger throughout the video was Rettke himself. Indeed, praise was later conferred upon the black students for demonstrating forbearance — namely, for not kicking Rettke’s monkey ass all over the free-speech zone.

Recourse to violence was in fact discussed among the BLM protestors, but it was expressly eschewed. “I’ma whup his muhfuckin’ ass,” and “I really just want to kill you,” were audible comments from the BLM protesters, followed by exhortations to maintain composure from other students, who reckoned that triggering a physical altercation was precisely Rettke’s objective.

Rettke’s comportment that day went “against the values of our university where people come first and all are treated with dignity and respect,” ETSU President Brian Noland said in a statement later. “We are exceptionally proud of the students who were peacefully participating in the event and the manner in which they exercised restraint, thoughtfulness and strength in the face of inappropriate and offensive behavior.”

All the same, First Amendment advocates and legal specialists who’ve examined the case are left with the impression that the prosecutors in East Tennessee, as well as university administrators, are apparently unschooled in developments involving American free-speech jurisprudence over the past hundred years.

Hung Jury or Lynch Mob?

Rettke’s lawyer, Patrick Denton, maintains First Amendment case law is decidedly on his client’s side — although whether a Tennessee jury will agree remains to be seen.

Jury nullification may also come into play. That’s what happens when one or more members of the panel refuse on moral or ethical grounds to convict, despite sufficient evidence that the defendant is technically guilty of the violation charged — particularly when the law or charges at issue are perceived as constitutionally suspect or lacking righteous legitimacy. 

To Denton, a criminal defense attorney typically more at home arguing Fourth and Fifth Amendment issues than the intricacies of the First, one of the most vexing aspects of the case is that the events occurred in what’s purportedly a free-speech zone. From his own personal point of view, this case has brought Denton around to the informed conclusion that free-speech zones are a noxious, constitution-affronting concept.

“There shouldn’t be such a thing as a free-speech zone,” Denton said. “You know what the free-speech zone should be? Everywhere. Every public place. If there has to be a free-speech zone, does that mean that constitutional rights are selectively protected based on where people are?”

Denton said he expects the judge to allow him satisfactory latitude to “educate the jury on the First Amendment framework as best that I can.” If a conviction nonetheless results, Denton said an appeal will certainly ensue.

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, which — like the Tennessee ACLU, has opposed Rettke’s prosecution from the outset — notes that the “fighting words exception” cited in the DA office’s court filing represents an antiquated, obsolete legal doctrine that’s been “so deeply contradicted by a number of later Supreme Court cases that it is considered essentially dead.”

“The provocative nature of Rettke’s conduct stems from the fact that it is nearly universally considered to be offensive,” wrote FIRE’s Adam Steinbaugh in wake of the incident. “Yet, the offensive nature of speech is not a basis for the state to punish the speaker, as the First Amendment protects offensive speech. In the same vein, laws that base their application on whether others are offended fail to provide adequate notice to speakers as to what conduct is or is not prohibited.”

Tennessee ACLU president Hedy Weinberg said Rettke’s taunting “through the use of such charged and painful racist symbols” was unequivocally repugnant.

Nevertheless, she believes Rettke actions constitute no crime.

“While the student in this instance clearly intended to mock and provoke people, from video of the incident he did not appear to be making a targeted threat or to be creating a real fear of bodily harm,” said Weinberg. “Particularly in a public forum space where First Amendment protections are at their height, even this kind of contemptible racist speech is protected by the First Amendment.”

1st Amdt: An Open Invitation to Disputes

One case precedent that seems naturally relevant here dates back eight decades, when SCOTUS asserted that public officials in America are constitutionally precluded from punishing people for provoking others to anger through the exercise of speech.

By its very nature, “a function of free speech under our system of government is to invite dispute,” declared Justice William O. Douglas, writing for the majority in the Supreme Court’s 1949 Terminiello v. City of Chicago opinion.

That ruling overturned a priest’s conviction for “breach of the peace” resulting from a speech he gave that sparked a riot by protestors angered at his fulminations against Jews and President Franklin  Roosevelt, who, it’s worth noting in our current age of nakedly partisan judicial outcome-engineering, was responsible for nominating Douglas to the court of last resort in the first place.

Douglas, widely regarded as one of America’s staunchest 20th Century civil libertarian jurists, wrote that freedom of speech “may indeed best serve its high purpose when it induces a condition of unrest, creates dissatisfaction with conditions as they are, or even stirs people to anger.”

“Speech is often provocative and challenging,” he wrote.

And oftentimes expressions of controversial or contentious notions “may strike at prejudices and preconceptions and have profound unsettling effects,” Douglas wrote, adding that while perhaps not entirely absolute, the right to free speech in America is “nevertheless protected against censorship or punishment, unless shown likely to produce a clear and present danger of a serious substantive evil that rises far above public inconvenience, annoyance, or unrest.”

“There is no room under our Constitution for a more restrictive view,” Douglas concluded. “For the alternative would lead to standardization of ideas either by legislatures, courts, or dominant political or community groups.”

Given that the circumstances of the case Justice Douglas was writing about involved both the casting of collective ethnic aspersions and an actual resulting riot, it’s difficult to see how Rettke’s actions — which resulted in no violence, and were in fact laughed at by many — could be seen by a sober-minded Bill-of-Rights-supporting observer as not protected by the First Amendment and its relevant case law.

Protecting the Franchise

In fact, Rettke’s inconsiderate clowning arguably resulted, at least in the short run, in just the sort of “high purpose” that Justice Douglas said allowing free speech was designed to serve. It forced the other students to muster the integrity and wisdom to embrace a responsible and civilized course of action and refrain from lashing out in violence, even when provoked by an outrageously offensive exhibition of bigotry.

“It’s crazy that something negative brought so much positivity,” Madison, one of the students who video-recorded Rettke’s antics, said on a Facebook livestream later. “Tristan, if you are listening, I thank you for it. Because me and everybody who went through your despicable display — we’re better people because of it. We are stronger people because of it.”

The exalted and despised Baltimore humorist and quasi-misanthropic newspaper editor H.L. Mencken — whose daunting journalistic talents were put to pitiless literary effect during the Scopes Monkey Trial in Dayton nearly a century ago — wrote eloquent and relevant words about the nature of free speech that jurors in Jonesborough would do well to take under advisement.

As a lifelong chronicler of political fraud, public folly and societal stupidity, the Sage of Baltimore said he’d become “convinced that free speech is worth nothing unless it includes a full franchise to be foolish and even to be malicious.”

“The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one’s time defending scoundrels,” Mencken said. “For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all.”

Use-permit and mandatory safety course under consideration for entry into gorge area after Sunday tragedy

Trails in and out of the Cummins Falls river-gorge area in Jackson County have been closed as a result of a fatal weekend flash flood that took the life of a 2-year-old boy.

Jim Bryson, deputy director of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, issued a memo Wednesday affirming that access to the Blackburn Fork River at Cummins Falls State Park will remain blocked “until we can evaluate the incident and review and implement additional safety protocols.”

The memo was addressed to David W. Salyers, commissioner of TDEC, which is the agency that oversees state parks and natural areas in Tennessee.

“At a minimum, the falls and gorge area will remain closed until the department conducts a full assessment of the circumstances and considers and implements additional protocols to address rain events in the watershed area,” Bryson wrote.

Trails around the state park in the forest above the river gorge are still open.

On Sunday, more than 60 people had to be aided by regional rescue personnel after becoming trapped in the rugged river gorge below Cummins Falls as a result of rising waters and increasingly rapid currents. Fourteen people required “swiftwater or rope evacuation” in order to reach safety.

The child who died, Steven Pierce of Eddyville, Ky., was reportedly separated from his family in treacherous currents and subsequently drowned. His body was located Monday morning “a couple hundred yards” downstream from the falls, a state parks official said.

The sudden stream surge — which arose in just a couple minutes — resulted from thunderstorms dumping rain upstream in the watershed, not over the state park itself, according to state park officials.

Four Tennessee state lawmakers who represent the surrounding region issued a sternly worded letter to Bryson on Tuesday, asking why additional safety measures promised in the past haven’t yet been implemented at the park, which has been the site of fatalities resulting from sudden water-rises before.

“In 2017, your department announced plans to install a warning system at Cummins Falls State Park to better monitor the gorge’s rising water levels,” stated the letter, written by Republican Sen. Paul Bailey of Sparta, House GOP Caucus Chairman Cameron Sexton of Crossville, Republican Rep. Ryan Williams of Cookeville and Democratic Rep. John Mark Windle of Livingston. “It is now June 2019, another life has been lost and the warning system has still not been installed.”

They said assurances were made following the last fatality that “a system would be implemented in an effort to prevent further deaths.”

“Why has this warning system not been installed at Cummins Falls State Park? It is past time to make installing a warning system a priority,” they wrote. “We cannot continue losing precious lives at one of Tennessee’s most visited state parks. We ask for your immediate attention to this matter and prompt installation of a warning system before more lives are lost.”

Bryson’s memo, sent a day after receiving the correspondence from the legislators, outlines a series of “ongoing actions” to improve safety in the gorge. He said an “After Action Report” will examine park polices and investigate park staff’s actions “before, during and after the incident.”

Bryson said TDEC is in communication with the National Weather Service to better monitor the watershed above Cummins Falls and develop “a new protocol for warning of potentially dangerous situations.”

Also, water-level measuring devices will be placed upstream to alert park staff to surge hazards, he said.

“An emergency procurement authorization has been secured to purchase and install a water flow monitoring system as an early warning system,” wrote Bryson, who was just last month appointed to the TDEC position in which he now serves. “It will be installed with all possible speed.”

In the future, the Cummins Falls State Park may establish “a permit requirement that will help us manage the visitation and ensure visitors have attended the safety program before going down into the gorge.”

Cummins Falls park staff, he added, “will be set up to have monitors for regular weather updates and the ability to receive notification from the flow meters that we are working with (Tennessee Tech University) to implement.”

The Tennessee Department of Agriculture has announced that updated rules and modified permitting requirements are being applied to the state’s budding hemp-growing industry.

In a department press release issued Monday, state ag commissioner Charlie Hatch said hemp regulations have been changing at the federal level, and as a result Tennessee is “updating our program rules to be more consistent with how other crop programs are managed.”

The 2018 Farm Bill passed by Congress and signed by President Trump removed hemp from the federal controlled-substances list. Nevertheless, it’s still against federal and state law to grow even nonpsychoactive cannabis without a state-issued license.

In wake of the federal government’s loosening of hemp-growing restrictions, there’s been a massive expansion of interest in growing hemp just over the last year.

This year, the department has licensed more than 2,900 hemp growers  — whereas in 2018 TDA issued just 226 licenses.

Last season, Tennessee growers produced a state total of 1,034 acres of planted legal cannabis strains. Tennessee’s largest field was a 250-plot grown for fiber in Macon County, according to the department.

Tennessee hemp farmers last year spent on average about $2,301 per acre cultivating their crops, a 2018 TDA survey reported.

“The three top expenses were land, equipment and labor,” the survey found. “Growers spent the least on acreage fees, inspections, and interest. The largest market appears to be in hemp oil high in cannabinoids.”

Department of agriculture officials say the new changes to the hemp program will “better serve hemp producers.”

Among the regulatory shifts is an elimination of application-period deadlines for obtaining a license to grow hemp. That process is now open year-round.

In addition, the state will no longer issue certifications for seed breeders. However, anyone marketing seed should seek licensing through TDA’s Ag Inputs section.

Also, hemp processors — unlike growers — won’t in the future be required to register through the state. Growers, on the other hand, will not only need to acquire “movement permits” when transporting rooted live plants, they’ll also be required to obtain official government permission and paperwork for transporting harvested hemp from a grow site.

Tennessee lawmakers in 2014 authorized the state Department of Agriculture to develop a licensing and inspection program for the production of hemp in Tennessee.

“Hemp has been an important crop throughout the history of the U.S., and to a certain extent in Tennessee,” according to TDA’s website.

In the 1800s, hemp fields were a common sight in Middle Tennessee.

“Although industrial hemp contains very little of the hallucinogenic properties of marijuana, production and processing declined after World War II with the passage of state and federal laws aimed at regulating the narcotic varieties of Cannabis,” says TDA’s hemp history info page. “Its decline was further accelerated with the development and availability of cheap synthetic fibers. Also, the resurgence of cotton production in the deep South was likely a contributing factor to hemp’s decline.”

This weekend state parks and wildland recreation areas across Tennessee will be hosting guided hikes, special activities and volunteer events in celebration of National Trails Day.

On the first Saturday of June for the past 26 years, the American Hiking Society has promoted a nationwide gathering of hikers of all ages, abilities and experience levels to discover or rediscover a sense of beauty and adventure along a local public-lands footpath.

Thousands of the trail-marching meet-ups are hosted throughout the country throughout the day.

The concept for National Trails Day is to connect people with a wide range of trail activities on a single day.

This year, National Trails Day is expected to “establish a trail service world record” by having “the most people improving trails in a single day,” according to AHS.

National Trails Day represents “an opportunity for people to feel connected to nature and to learn about a Tennessee State Park at the same time with the guidance of a park ranger,” said Anne Marshall of the Department of Environment and Conservation. “Whether you’re interested in a park’s history, seeing incredible views or taking a challenging trek, our parks give everyone that feeling that you can’t get anywhere else.”

Below is a partial list of hikes and events scheduled for Saturday at Tennessee Upper Cumberland regional state parks. For a full statewide listing of National Trails Day activities, go to https://tnstateparks.com/about/special-events/national-trails-day-hikes/

Edgar Evins State Park

Millennium Trail Hike. 8-11am. Roughly 2.5 mile hike over moderately strenuous terrain.

2nd Annual Storybook Trail Ribbon-Cutting Party. 10am-1:30pm. Hike on the half-mile trail to see the new book, “Anybody Home?” Event includes craft-making for kids and a wild animal show.

Cummins Falls State Park

National Trails Day Hike. Meet at 9am, Tiny House by parking lot for 2.5-mile round-trip. Stops along the way by old Cummins house, waterfalls overlook and base of falls. (See page 1 story.)

Cedars of Lebanon

2:30-4pm. Explore newly acquired Sadie Ford Historic Farm.

9am-noon. Volunteers gathering for trail-maintenance and park beautification activities. Meet at Nature Center.

Fall Creek Falls

Hike to the Base of Fall Creek Falls. Meet at 9am at the Main Overlook of Fall Creek Falls at 9:00am central time for a short but strenuous hike to the bottom of the falls.

Virgin Falls State Natural Area

Hike to Virgin Falls. 8am-4pm. Strenuous 9-mile in-and-out trip. Features spectacular waterfalls and other lovely Cumberland Plateau water features. Hike is free, but call for registration (limit 20 people).

Rock Island State Park

Collins River Trail Hike. 10am. Meet with ranger at trailhead on National Trails Day for free interpretive walk around moderately difficult two-and-a-half mile-loop.

Burgess Falls State Park

9-10:30am. Park Manager Bill Summers will lead free guided stroll.

South Cumberland State Park

Work on Collins Gulf Trail. 9am-3pm. Join staff for a day of building trail in beautiful Collins Gulf to celebrate NTD at South Cumberland SP.

Cordell Hull Birthplace State Park

Lecture: Tennessee’s Superb Suffragists: A Legacy of Leadership. 1pm. Tennessee women’s suffrage movement scholar Paula F. Casey will discuss ratification of 19th Amendment.

Paddlesport fishing promoters chart course into international waters

A potentially sea-changing angling competition is set to launch on the vast, bass-rich reaches of Center Hill Lake at the end of May.

During the week following Memorial Day, elite kayak anglers from across the Western Hemisphere will converge on the Upper Cumberland to test their skills and try their luck against one another in a first-of-its-kind invitational tournament that organizers hope baits the hook for bigger fish to fry down the line.

The Caney Fork River’s impounded waters behind Center Hill Dam will serve as venue to a distinguished lineup of paddle-and-pole wielding mastercasters who’ll compete in this year’s inaugural Pan-American Kayak Bass Championship.

Drew Gregory will participate in the Pan American Kayak Fishing Championship on Center Hill Lake May 28-31.

Countries slated to ship angler-ambassadors here to contend against the USA Bass Kayak team for transcontinental bass bragging rights include Canada, Mexico, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Puerto Rico, Honduras and the Dominican Republic.

The overarching goal of the tournament is to lay the foundation for establishing an officially sanctioned world-championship kayak fishing competition — which could lead ultimately to recognition and embrace of the sport by the International Olympic Committee.

At a minimum, the multinational USA Bass-sponsored meet-up will elevate Center Hill Lake’s profile, and burnish the Upper Cumberland’s reputation as a paddling-angler’s paradise second to none.

Participants are expected to arrive early and stay late exploring various regional fisheries in addition to Center Hill — like Cordell Hull and Dale Hollow lakes, as well Cumberland River Basin moving-water jewels, like the upper and lower reaches of the Caney Fork and its multispecies-filled tributaries, the Falling Water, Calfkiller and Collins rivers.

A Natural Fit

The Cookeville-Putnam County Visitors’ Bureau is responsible for luring the event to the area.

This region is a “natural fit” for high-end angling tournaments and other adventure-sport gatherings with the capacity to draw substantial crowds of participants and spectators, said Zach Ledbetter, vice president of visitor development.

“We have an ideal destination for outdoor enthusiasts, especially those who want to compete on calm and bass-filled waters,” said Ledbetter. “Aside from the outstanding hospitality of our community, the value of our natural assets allows us to welcome anglers from all over the world.”

Ledbetter put together a bid package last fall that outshined efforts by other fishing destinations — including Columbia, S.C., Hot Springs, Ark. and Branson, Mo.

“Cookeville and Center Hill Lake quickly became the clear choice to host this historic event,” said Tony Forte, president of USA Bass and founder of the U.S Angling Confederation, a nonprofit sport-fishing advocacy group.

The public is encouraged to meet and mingle with anglers at the tournament launch areas — Ragland Bottom Recreation Area, Cane Hollow Boat Ramp and Rock Island State Park.

Forte said tournament officials “looked at Dale Hollow pretty hard, too.” But DHL lacked CHL’s logistical appeal, he said. Center Hill Lake is situated nearer Nashville and I-40 — and it’s neighbored by inviting communities like Sparta, McMinnville and Smithville in addition to Cookeville.

Tourism-focused businesses throughout the area may get a bite of extra business from the Pan Am event. “We really hope this proves advantageous to the host communities, and commerce is obviously part of that process,” said Forte. “If this event allows for some guided fishing trips and more stays in local hotels and meals in local restaurants and those kinds of things, then we’re all about it.”

That’s obviously what Ledbetter has in mind, too. And he echoed a sentiment shared by chamber leaders around the Upper Cumberland: visitors come here for numerous regional attractions, so it makes sense to work across county lines to promote events, activities and destinations.

Cookeville serves as a destination hub for the Upper Cumberland, Ledbetter said, and visitors will often roam out to explore the surrounding region using the city as a base camp. In fact, none of the Pan Am tournament launch points are actually in Putnam County — Cane Hollow is in White County, Ragland Bottom is in DeKalb, and Rock Island is in Warren.

“We push day trips a lot,” Ledbetter said. “Whether visitors just stay right here in Cookeville, or go out to places like Cumberland Caverns in Warren County or Granville in Jackson County, we consider it a win for all of us.”

Big Name Boaters

Forte said kayak angling has for the past decade been “exploding worldwide.” But as yet it “hasn’t evolved to the point where it’s making household names.”

“That’s part of what a tournament like ours is designed to do,” he said.

Chad Hoover

The Pan Am Kayak Bass Championship could launch competitive kayak angling onto the global stage — and likewise position the Upper Cumberland to anchor future international tournaments.

“I would love to see a world championship come to Cookeville at some point — where we invite all the nations’ best kayak anglers to come,” said Forte. “We’re hoping we can make that happen.”

If the anglers competing to win the Pan Am aren’t household names exactly, some aren’t altogether unrecognizable either.

The two biggest names on the U.S. team are probably those belonging to Chad Hoover and Eric Jackson.

Both are media-savvy adventure-sport entrepreneurs who’ve navigated their life’s passions into lucrative careers that allow them to spend a lot of their waking hours on the water for a living.

A resident of Hendersonville, Hoover hosts Youtube’s most popular kayak fishing channel.

Not only has Hoover been a kayak-fishing fanatic for two decades — long before its popularity caught on — he’s organized some of the largest North American paddlesport angling tournaments ever held. His KBF brand is one of the Pan Am tournament’s sponsors — although he himself is solely a participant.

Eric Jackson

Jackson is already a pioneering, world championship-winning athlete ranked among whitewater kayaking’s most accomplished competitors in the sport’s history. Propelling himself onto the winner’s dock to hoist aloft the first ever Pan Am kayak bass champion’s trophy would constitute a truly remarkable follow-up to Jackson’s brilliant 30-year whitewater paddling career.

There’s also the fact that the company Jackson founded is probably the most identifiable paddlesport boat-maker in the world.

Jackson Kayak’s immense White County factory headquarters bolstered the area’s allure to Pan Am organizers. JK is helping sponsor the event and will provide kayaks for anglers visiting from far-flung foreign fisheries.

Springtime Is Primetime

Speaking of which, home-water advantage for Tennessee anglers like Hoover and Jackson won’t likely play as big a factor in the Pan Am championship as might typically be expected, according to a pair of veteran anglers well accustom to competing in bass tournaments on Center Hill Lake.

The Pan Am’s timing coincides with what’s typically some of CHL’s hottest bass fishing, said local pros Josh Tramel and Adam Wagner.

Tramel lives in Smithville and Wagner in Cookeville, and both have earned more tournament wins and money finishes on the lake than either can rightly recall. Each could stock an enviable trophy room just with Center Hill Lake hardware they’ve collected over the decades.

Already this year Tramel has landed an FLW first-place trophy on CHL in a tournament that saw Wagner place 5th. Wagner netted a victory on Dale Hollow Lake over the winter — his 11th career victory in FLW Bass Fishing League competitions, tying him at third for most FLW tourney first-place finishes of all time.

Pan Am anglers will compete for inches rather than pounds.

Tramel and Wagner say black bass on CHL in late May will likely be holding in relatively shallow water, and probably in a mood to bite and fight. That’s good news for anglers unfamiliar with the lake’s perplexing range of deeper-water structure, around which bass will spend most of their daytime hours after water temps start their summertime climb in June.

Tramel expects Pan Am tournament anglers will locate fish in water less than 15 feet deep — maybe even less than 10 feet in some areas. “The 10- or 12-foot range will catch them at that time of year,” he said.

Another nice thing about spring fishing is that anglers can choose from a variety of plugs, plastics and presentation tactics that will yield success, said Wagner.

“It’ll be really, really good in late May,” he said. “That post-spawn bite over there is always good. You can catch them on topwater, you can catch them on a Carolina rig, you can catch them on a crankbait or a spoon. There are just a whole lot of things you can do to catch fish on Center Hill at that time of year.”

Tramel said Pan Am competitors might have difficulty tracking down paunchy females, but aggressive males will be guarding schools of recently hatched fry and “will be hitting pretty good.”

“It’s a really good time for like two-and-a-half to three-and-a-quarter-pounders,” he said.

Like Wagner, Tramel expects surface-swimming lures will make for good fishing during the tournament, which isn’t always the case on Center Hill.

“Topwater will be a player. There will probably be a lot of fish caught on topwater at that point,” Tramel said. “There’ll also be some good fish caught on a shakey head, drop-shot sort of thing. My favorite thing would be pitching at that point in the year — pitching a jig or some plastics, bigger-profile type baits.”

One of Tramel’s standard strategies on CHL is to keep moving. He avoids spending too much time in one area if he’s not hooking up — even if he’s already boated a couple in the vicinity. It’s kind of unusual to catch multiple keeper-size fish in one location on Center Hill, he said.

If they were competing in the Pan Am tournament, both Wagner and Tramel say they’d want to launch from Cane Hollow or Ragland Bottom.

“With either one of those, you wouldn’t have to go far at all to catch fish,” Wagner said. “You could basically put in and start fishing. All the area around both Ragland and Cane Hollow is pretty good.”

“I fish around Cane Hollow a lot,” Tramel said. “It is up in Falling Water River and there are just a couple different sorts of structure-types, but historically the fish will be hitting back in there.”

Located in the heart of the Center Hill Lake, the Army Corps of Engineers-managed Ragland Bottom recreation area offers a wealth of fish-habitat diversity in many directions.

“There’s a lot of versatile water around there where you can do a lot of different things,” Tramel said. “You’ve got the main channel, you’ve creeks and pockets and all different kinds of structure that the fish can get in to.”

Certain areas of the lake are better for smallmouth than largemouth, and visa versa, Tramel noted.

“Whereas in Falling Water, you’re going to be targeting largemouth primarily, around Ragland Bottom you’re going to have access to whatever bass species you want to fish for,” he said.

Spotted bass caught on Center Hill have lately been running smaller than smallmouth and largemouth, Tramel added.

Wagner disclosed that Davies Island, located about two river miles north of Ragland, is a Center Hill sweet spot.

“It’s got some very good current through there, especially when they’re really pulling water (at the dam),” he said. “There are a lot of spots there, where current hits, that are really good.”

Davies Island is positioned at the confluence of the Falling Water and Caney Fork river arms. The island is four miles in circumference and “a huge population of fish” tend to congregate around it, said Wagner.

Fishing in a kayak is quite a bit different than fishing in a boat. Whereas stealth and maneuverability are a kayak’s chief attributes, bass boats can obviously cover a lot more water.

Tramel and Wagner agree that not being able to zip across the lake at 60 miles an hour in search of covert bass cover would dramatical change how they’d approach a tournament.

“In a bass boat, I can run from one end of the lake to the other in not a whole lot of time,” Tramel said. “In a kayak, you better start where there are some fish, or you’re probably going to be in trouble.”

Cookeville mom-on-the-go publishing (healthy) hamburger cookbook

Alane Boyd isn’t a woman with a lot of extra time on her hands.

The Putnam County software engineer-entrepreneur may have “retired” for the first time at just 35 after selling a successful company she and her husband co-founded, but her daily life remains a whirl of activity and enterprise — hence her Instagram handle: @the_hurricanealane.

Boyd spends most of her waking hours working in assorted roles as business consultant, marketing specialist, entrepreneur coach and motivational speaker. And that’s in addition to pursuing various avenues of philanthropy and volunteer activity in the local community and beyond.

“I’ve got a three-year-old, I’ve got multiple businesses, I’ve got a husband and I travel all the time,” Boyd told Center Hill Sun recently at her Cookeville office in The Biz Foundry.

Well-Heeled Homemaker

Typically the antithesis of a frowsy hausfrau, on any given weekday Boyd’s rarely spied attired in footwear other than her trademark stilettos.

All the same, Boyd’s foremost functions as a woman of industrious pursuits are far and away those of wife and toddler’s mommy. And in keeping with her unwillingness to compromise her ambitions, she’s wholly resistant to outsourcing her homemaking labors of love to unwholesome outside influences.

A daily question with which Boyd wrestles is, “How to manage it all and try to eat healthy?”

“BurgerFit,” a cookbook by Putnam County food show host, author and tech entrepreneur Alane Boyd, is coming out June 1.

In fact, she’s something of a fanatic about feeding her family well.

“Cooking healthy and tasty meals is my passion,” says Boyd, who also hosts an amiably instructional Youtube channel called, “Cooking With My Friends.”

She bills her program, “The best healthy cooking show on the internet.” On a typical episode, Boyd and her guests whip up quick and easy recipes usually intended to emphasize you’re “never too old or too young to start eating vegetables.”

Later this spring — just in time for grilling season — Boyd is set to release “BurgerFit.” It’s a self-published cookbook cataloging a bumper-crop of unexpected components and directions for rustling up healthy versions of “America’s favorite food.”

Does it sound counterintuitive or implausible to think of hamburgers as “health food”?

Well, bear in mind that Boyd is an engineer by trade. That means she specializes in developing systems that work.

She has appetizingly discovered that hamburger patties make an ideal delivery means for surreptitiously smuggling vegetables into an unsuspecting family member’s diet

“No one asks before they take a bite of burger, what is in it,” Boyd writes in the introduction of her cookbook. “A burger is a trusted food.”

Sustainable Slenderizing

When she was in middle school, Boyd began struggling with weight issues — a problem that followed her into adulthood. She and her husband, Micah, would often go out for drinks and dinner after a long workday. Invariably, they’d overindulge. She recalls often thinking, “I’ve got to get myself under control.”

But it took a “wake-up call” in the form of an early-onset high blood pressure diagnosis to finally convince her that lifestyle adjustments were required.

So, using the Whole30 weight-loss program, she shed 40 pounds and gained a new outlook on food and health. “A huge component of my success was replacing meals that I usually ate with bread and carbs with vegetables,” she said.

Over time it became apparent to Boyd however that while an elimination-style diet may have worked wonders for her, it carried little appeal to those around her — especially her family from Louisiana, where she grew up.

Hamburger Humbuggery

When Boyd’s kin from Cajun Country popped in for a visit, they bluntly regarded meals devoid of sugar, carbs, dairy and beans as preposterous and repellent. To their way of thinking, those were key ingredients in life’s happiness recipe book.

“They wouldn’t eat anything that I cooked,” Boyd said. “They’d just eat a piece of meat and then go to the grocery store and get bread, and they would just eat meat and bread.”

One of the things Boyd learned on her own journey to better health is that changes made to your eating habits need be enjoyable to become sustainable. They won’t last otherwise.

She inevitably concluded that healthy cooking for her meat-loving, veggie-loathing family would require a generous dollop of subterfuge.

“I started blending up the vegetables and making the burgers with them,” she writes. “If they saw me cooking the vegetables, I would tell them that was for my dinner and they didn’t have to eat them. When they weren’t looking, I would make the patties with the veggies.”

Over time, Boyd cultivated a sly culinary aptitude for the art of skillet skulduggery, all the while gaining evermore beguiling skills as a cunning cheeseburger enchantress. Of course, were she ever found out, Boyd understood that dark oaths and perhaps accusations of witchery might fly in her direction — especially from her brothers, who she said never made it a secret they were “opposed to vegetables.”

But that didn’t happen. On the contrary, Boyd’s assembled an ample menu of meat-and-veggie patty blends that unfailingly cast a satisfying spell over even the most ardent carnivore test subjects.

“Everyone would rave about how delicious they were, and then ask what was in them,” Boyd writes in BurgerFit. “I got very comfortable with not telling them the truth. If I did, they would never eat another burger I made them. I would brush the question off and name a veggie that I knew they liked that looked similar to the veggie in the burger that they wouldn’t eat. Green peas became greens, red beets became purple cabbage, carrots became sweet potatoes.”

Boyd hopes BurgerFit becomes a hit for making all manner of ground-meat creations, not just hamburgers and not just beef.

“You can use any type of ground meat you would like,” an FAQ page on Boyd’s website communicates. “Ground pork, turkey, chicken, etc. make delicious BurgerFit burgers. If you are vegetarian or vegan, you can even replace the meat with lentils, beans, or your favorite meat substitute.”

Most any meat can make a nice patty if the meat-to-plant-material ratios are correct, Boyd said. However, it’s generally not a great idea to try and force more than two cups of cooked and cut-up veggies into a pound of ground meat, she reports. Doing so runs the risk of burgers falling apart, and thus detection

Boyd keeps a stash of pre-made burgers on hand in the freezer for quick access and fast prep. And she doesn’t hesitate to “deconstruct” them for other uses, especially tacos.

The ultimate message of BurgerFit is that you don’t have to compromise great flavor to compose a burger that’s got more nutrition to it than meets the eye.

“Even if you don’t like vegetables, don’t have time, and don’t like cooking, BurgerFit burgers are so easy to make and taste so good, that you can’t help but make them,” said Boyd.

If you’d like to get an early look or pre-order a copy of BurgerFit, which is scheduled for release in early June, visit Boyd’s website at http://burgerfitcookbook.com/.

Vintage farm furnishes antique mystique to area rich in natural magnetism

A new land-donation to the Virgin Falls State Natural Area allows visitors to stroll back into history a bit and ponder life lived at a slower pace during a more down-to-earth era.

A 19th century homestead adjoining eastern White County’s picturesque Dog Cove, which includes a still-habitable farmhouse and period outbuildings, has been added to the state of Tennessee’s public recreation-land holdings.

The state Department of Environment and Conservation — which along with Tennessee fish and wildlife officials manages the area — is ultimately planning to upgrade the vintage home so as to make it available for overnight guest rental. At this time, however, it’s only open for day-use visitation.

The Beecher Wallace Homestead, named after the man who settled the property and built the home, barn and shed structures in the late 1800s, was purchased from Wallace family heirs last summer by the Land Trust of Tennessee. Ownership of the parcel was then transferred to the state in December. The property adjoins 750 rugged wildland acres also acquired by the state in recent years with financial and technical assistance from the Land Trust, Open Space Institute and Tennessee Parks and Greenways Foundation, according to TDEC.

Virgin Falls Natural Area Manager Stuart Carroll in Dog Cove.

A day-use area with eight miles of trails, Dog Cove is known for its small creeks, big woods, serene tranquility and lovely views.

“Dog Cove really is a true cove, reminiscent of Cades Cove in Smoky Mountain National Park,” said Stuart Carroll, park manager for Virgin Falls State Natural Area. “It’s not surrounded by mountains as high as around Cades Cove, but it’s a true cove in that there’s no water that escapes. The creeks appear and disappear, then reappear again. Then they finally they go underground — and that is the source for Virgin Falls and Lost Creek Falls.”

Liz McLaurin, president and CEO of the Land Trust, calls it “a magical place.”

“The conservation of this swath of land is an example of the way, over time, land trusts and partners can build relationships that stitch together special places for the enjoyment of Tennesseans and visitors now and forever,” said McLaurin.

A primary aspect of the Land Trust’s mission is working with landowners to purchase property and “create conservation solutions for Tennessee’s important places,” said Emily Parish, vice president for tho group.

“Dog Cove’s wildlife habitat, caves, creeks and storied history will be cared for and be accessible to the public for generations to come,” Parish said. She called the acquisition effort “a tremendous success for the growing corridor of protected land in the area.”

Likewise, Tom Lee, a Beecher Wallace family descendent who’s been taking care of the place for years, said he’s glad an arrangement was reached that both preserves the property and enables others to appreciate the homestead land and history.

“This place has meant a lot to my family for generations,” said Lee. “We are grateful to know others will have the opportunity to enjoy it and that it will always be cared for.”

Ranger Carroll said the Beecher Wallace farmhouse was built in 1888. Prior to that an old log house was situated on the site. He noted that some work needs to be done on the house before it can be open to the public for overnight stays.

Nevertheless, the Beecher Wallace home “is in pretty good shape for a 120-year-old house,” said Carroll. He credits that to regular maintenance and repair efforts by Mr. Lee, a longtime Cookeville-based home-renovation specialist.

“It’s going to be a nice place for people to come for a getaway,” said Carroll.

Over the years, the state has set aside a corridor network of protected lands across Tennessee’s mid-Cumberland Plateau. Among the patchwork are Fall Creek Falls State Park, Lost Creek State Natural Area, Virgin Falls State Natural Area, Bledsoe State Forest, and Bridgestone-Firestone Centennial Wilderness Wildlife Management Area. Other natural lands adjoining those are the Bridgestone Nature Reserve at Chestnut Mountain and Latimer High Adventure Reservation.

Taken as a whole, the plateau conservation corridor connects around 60,000 acres of “significant protected forested habitat,” according to TDEC.

The Nashville District Office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is anticipating that heavy rains over the past weeks will result in higher-than-normal pool elevations for some time on the Cumberland River system lakes it manages.

Center Hill Lake, Dale Hollow, Percy Priest and Lake Cumberland in Kentucky are all discharging vast quantities of water in wake of a storm system that dumped 3-4 inches of rain around the region late last week.

Precipitation Friday and Saturday raised reservoirs along the Cumberland River to levels not seen since the spring floods of 2010 or before. Rainfall in Nashville for the month of February this year has surpassed 13.5 inches — reportedly breaking a previous record set in 1880.

The reservoir level behind Center Hill Dam Monday morning was reported at over 677.43 feet and still rising. That’s 20 feet higher than it was early Saturday morning. Officials said the lake could rise above 680 feet before its starts to recede. That’s tremendously higher than the 625 feet that water-level managers want to get the lake down to before summer in order to finish a scheduled boat-ramp construction project near the dam.

The Corps’ Nashville District water management specialist Anthony Rodino predicts higher than normal water-releases for the foreseeable future from dams along the Cumberland.

Water levels along Center Hill Lake have eclipsed parking lots and shore-area recreation grounds. The picnic area adjacent to Edgar Evins Marina was completely submerged as of Sunday, as were a large portion of improved campground facilities at Floating Mill Park near Hurricane Marina.

Despite well-publicized concerns over the years about the structural soundness of dams along the Cumberland River system — especially Center Hill and Wolf Creek in Kentucky — Nashville District USACE commander Cullen Jones said the impoundments have performed flawlessly so far.

“While there were localized flooding impacts, especially along unregulated waterways, the Corps of Engineers dams held a lot of water back,” Jones said.

According to the Corps, Nashville water levels “would have exceeded 55 feet without the dams holding water during recent rains.”

“The water level in Nashville crested in minor flood stage near 41 feet, so the dams reduced the water level on the Cumberland River in Music City over 14 feet,” the USACE press release said.

March means angling madness for Rock Island’s early spring spawners

Ask around what’s the best-eating freshwater fish and there’s a good chance walleye tops any serious angler’s menu.

True, walleye aren’t necessarily know for their bellicose resistance subsequent to biting a bait — leastwise not in the manner of, say, a burly smallmouth or mean-spirited musky. But owing to their delectable flavor, delicate flaky texture and bulky fillet slabs, walleye are as prized as any game fish that prowls the waters of North America.

Dale Gribble and the eye-popping walleye wall mount he made for display at the Rock Island State Park ranger station. Contact Gribble’s fishing-guide and taxidermy service at 931-743-8163.

Even though they’re not officially considered a cold-water fish, walleye are regarded by many as something of a “northern” species. To give an indication, at least three cities in Minnesota alone lay claim to the title of “Walleye Capital of the World.”

But in fact, at certain times of year, walleye fishing below the Mason-Dixon line — especially here in Tennessee — is superior even to renown Upper Midwest hotspots like the Big Lake They Called Gitche Gumee.

For starters, the world record walleye was caught by a man named Marbry Harper on Old Hickory Lake in 1960. At 41 inches and 25 pounds, that fish dwarfed the 17-18 pounders that stand as state records in Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin.

A lot of people are unaware that three years prior to the Old Hickory catch, Center Hill Lake produced a behemoth-class monster that, at 21-pounds 4-ounces, was a certified U.S. record until eclipsed by the Harper fish. You can stop in and see that fabled catch for yourself at the Rock Island State Park ranger office, where it is mounted on the wall with a placard telling the tale of how local anglers Bennie “Buck” Bryant and Glen Grissom hauled it ashore after a 20-minute tug o’ war one frigid January day in 1957.

For 54-year-old local fishing guide and master taxidermist Dale Gribble, there indeed does not exist a finer body of water than Center Hill Lake for landing trophy walleye.

Bennie “Buck” Bryant and Glen Grissom caught a 21¼ lb. walleye on Center Hill Lake in 1957. At the time it was a national record. Pictured above is Bryant and then 2-year-old Jimmy Grissom. (Photo via TN State Library and Archives)

“In my personal opinion, there is no better place anywhere in the world for walleye fishing,” said Gribble. “I have fished for walleye everywhere — from here to Canada and all over Canada. Fishing for walleye, that’s my thing. And I can tell you that when it’s on, there’s no beating walleye fishing on Center Hill Lake.”

Gribble maintains that the record Rock Island walleye isn’t even the biggest walleye he’s personally witnessed lugged out of a Center Hill honey hole.

Once when Gribble was fishing with his grandfather back in the mid-1970s, he said they observed a couple elderly anglers tow in a brute that would have eclipsed even the Old Hickory monstrosity.

“I will never forget it. They caught that thing on a bluegill, and it was he biggest walleye I’ve ever seen,” said Gribble. “I still remember the exact bush they were tied on to when they caught it. You couldn’t believe it — that fish was massive. It was huge.”

“I had a picture for years and years — I wish I still did,” he added. “It was hanging on a scale and it weighed 27 pounds. That would be a world record today.” Gribble said it measured “right around 38 inches.”

Not every walleye is a trophy, but they’re always good-eating. Here a first-time walleye fisherman shows off his catch below Cordell Hull Dam. (Photo Credit: Bill Medley, Medley Fishing School. 615-397-4137)

But it was never reported for any kind of record verification. The guys who caught it “were a couple of old-timers who didn’t care about stuff like that,” said Gribble.

As far as predicting when the fishing is going to be “on,” there’s probably no better time than March, when walleye run by the thousands up Center Hill Lake’s headwaters on the Caney Fork for their yearly spawn. That’s when and where biologists from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency collect many of the walleye they use for breeding in state-run fry-rearing facilities, like the Normandy Fish Hatchery.

“The majority of the fish we collect come from Center Hill at Rock Island,” said Mike Jolley, the TWRA fisheries manager for Upper Cumberland reservoirs.

Because of their appetizing reputation, walleye that meet size-limit regulations “generally go home with people,” said Doug Markham, a four-decade veteran of TWRA who retired last year.

For that reason, stocking programs are important for maintaining strong numbers. “It’s a fishery that needs some help to sustain itself in a lot of these waters,” Markham said. In a lot of places like the Cumberland River system, walleye “would still be there if it wasn’t for stocking, but they wouldn’t be there is such abundance,” he said.