Press Release from the Tennessee Artist’s Guild, Sept. 12, 2019:

Watertown, TN September 12, 2019 — Businesses and artists have come together to create a day to view visual arts and celebrate the season all around the city of Watertown on October 5, 2019.

The free event features several locations from artist studios and galleries to local businesses who will have at least one visual artist on site. Many of the locations have several artists whose work can be seen. Mediums range from paintings to fine crafts and the artists will be available for purchases or special commissions.

The time of the art walk will be 11 am to 6 pm on Saturday and will be complimented with live music by the Best Wurst Band and German style games at the gazebo. There will also be vendors at the pavilion near the rail road tracks.

Refreshments will be available. The event will support the Tennessee Artist’s Guild which is a non-profit dedicated to bringing opportunities to Watertown that feature visual artists, musicians, and theatrical performances.

Come to the Artizan Insurance and Gifts building at 214 Public Square to pick up a list of locations on the day of the event.

Visit www.tnartistsguild.org for more information or call Vickie Frazier at 615-697-5066.

Ralph’s Donut Shop a local Cookeville landmark for coffee, pastry and community

Cynthia and Mark Pullum operate what may be the sweetest spot in Putnam County. Ralph’s Donut Shop rolls out well over 5,000 yeast and cake donuts a day, which rounds out to about one-and-half million a year.

Five-year-old Charlotte knows exactly what she wants when she goes to Ralph’s. (Photo by Ken Beck.)

The wife-and-husband team has been the guardian of the legacy business for the past nine years, as they took the reins after the death of Cynthia’s father, the eponymous Ralph Smith who started it all.

The only downer about Cynthia and Mark’s success is that they rarely sample these delicious, deep-fried hunks of sweet dough.

Asked how many donuts he eats a day, with a smile on his face, Mark answered, “None. My wife doesn’t either. The donut shop is run by two diabetics. I might eat one a year.”

Nevertheless, they know about everything there is to know about donuts. Ralph’s Donut Shop was voted the best in Tennessee in a 2015 online “Donut Brawl” poll, and its glazed donut was selected one of best 25 donuts in America in 2016 by The Daily Meal.

Ralph and Evelyn Smith opened Ralph’s Donut Shop in September 1962 with only six stools. Today the sweet spot boasts 26 stools around two, long U-shaped counters and a small table that seats three. Ralph made the donuts, and Evelyn did the waitressing. This vintage photo rests on a shelf in the shop. Before the donut shop moved in, the building was home to Haskell Grogan’s grocery store and then a Greyhound bus station.

(Believe it or not, the average American is estimated to eat 31 donuts a year, while U.S. donut shops make more than 10 billion donuts annually.)

Much of the credit for the success goes back to Ralph, who was born in Carthage and grew up on a farm in the Smith County community of Buffalo Valley.

The World War II veteran and his wife, Evelyn, owned and operated the shop for 48 years, until Ralph’s death in 2010 at the age of 84.

Describing her dad, Cynthia said, “He was kind of gruff. He scared a lot of people with his voice, but he was jolly and loved to have fun. He was a big cut-up and loved to be the center of attention.”

She shared that their donut recipe was concocted by her father and Dallas Frazier, who also worked at the shop 48 years.

“My dad and Dallas came up with the recipe themselves. Dallas is every bit as important as Ralph,” said Cynthia.

Ralph and Evelyn sold their first donut in September 1962, and Ralph’s nephew, James Smith, was an eyewitness to the transaction.

“I can remember going up there the day they opened with my parents and my two aunts. One of the aunts said, ‘I want to be the first customer.’ She orders up a donut and a carton of milk, and it was less than a dollar. Ralph took that dollar bill and laid it on the counter beside the cash register and said, ‘That’s not going in the register.’ Later they had it framed and put on the wall,” said Smith, who lives in South Carthage.

“That place was a blowing and going back in the ’60s. Ralph and Evelyn put in some hours. A lot of the success was because of their willingness to work. Ralph was always smiling,” added Smith, noting that his uncle would not sell a donut over 24 hours old.

At first, the shop held only six stools for customers to sit in while they fueled up on donuts and coffee. In 1974, the couple remodeled the shop, and the result was 26 stools parked around two long U-shaped counters. Most mornings before 9 a.m. or so, it is not unusual for every seat to be filled.

From its inception until 1992, the donut shop operated 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Nowadays it is open 5 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

Nobody knows how many donuts have been produced here over 57 years, but Frazier, who also made and decorated cakes, takes a guess: “I’d say it’s up in millions or billions.”

He recollected that his first day on the job, Ralph told him there was a little problem.

“Ralph said, ‘I’m working two types of donut mix. I cannot get a good one out. One’s too tough, and one’s too slack.’ I asked, ‘What are you mixing?’ He said, ‘Eighteen pound of each mix.’ I said, ‘Let’s mix nine pound of each dough and see how it comes out,’ and that’s what they’re running today,” said Frazier.

CHOCOLATE OR GLAZED? These are but two of 40 donut and pastry choices at Ralph’s Donut Shop, a Cookeville landmark that served its first donut 57 years ago. The donut shop has been operated by Ralph’s daughter, Cynthia, and her husband, Mark Pullum (seen here), for the past nine years. Ralph’s Donut Shop was voted the best in Tennessee in 2015 and its glazed donut named one of the best 25 donuts in America by The Daily Meal in 2016. (Photos by Ken Beck)

As for how Ralph entered the donut business, Cynthia shared the details.

“My mom’s brother, my uncle Bill Elam, had opened a donut shop in Dayton, Ohio, in 1960,” she said. Bill’s Donut Shop is in fact still in business, run by two of his children and now located in Centerville, Ohio.

“Mama and Dad went up to Ohio for seven months and learned how to make donuts. Then they came back, and he drove a gas truck for Apple Oil Company. They saved their money and opened in September of 1962,” she said. “I remember telling my dad when I was 8 years old I was ready to come to work, and he put me on a Coke case washing pans every Saturday.”

Mark did not get his hands into the dough until 2010, the year they married.

“I got plunged into it. My wife and her brother [Jimmy] inherited it. She called me and asked me if I would run it. I been here ever since,” Mark said.

Mark actually made his first visit to Ralph’s with his mother more than half a century ago  — literally before he was born. “She was eating donuts here when I was in the womb,” he said.

As a boy, Mark would come with his dad to town on Saturdays, and his father would give him a quarter and send him to get a donut. “I would buy a donut, and Ralph gave me my quarter back and would say, ‘Don’t tell your dad.’”

As for what it takes to make a great donut, the donut man said “patience and learning how to work with the dough.”

The shop, which employs a staff of 20, turns out 40 varieties of donuts and pastries. Their best-seller is the butter twist, followed by a tie between the apple fritters and lady fingers.

Cynthia holds a day job in the Putnam County clerk and master’s office, but works at the shop on Saturdays panning donuts and waitressing while Mark tends to farm chores.

She says the best thing about owning a donut shop is “watching somebody who has never had a donut before they take their first bite.”

About their tasty, doughy morsels, Mark said, “We just try to take our time and do it right. It’s all done by hand. Nothing has changed since it started. We’ve added a few things [to the menu], but otherwise it’s exactly the same as when Ralph was here.”

Retired donut guru Frazier explains that he had to bargain with Ralph before he was hired.

“I was working at a donut shop up the street, and he sent for me to come down there, and he wanted me to work for him. So I told him, ‘I got a job.’ He said, ‘Well, I need you.’ I said, ‘What do you pay?’ He said, ‘I can pay a dollar and a quarter an hour. I said, ‘Naw, I’m making that where I am. I have to have a dollar thirty anyway.’ He said, ‘I can’t pay that.’

“I started for the door, and Evelyn said, ‘You better call him back.’ He said, ‘I’ll pay you.’ I went to work for them about a week later.”

Donut maker Cletus Spivey, hoisting a batch of chocolate twists, is a third-generation employee at Ralph’s Donut Shop. His mother, Michelle, worked here 32 years and his grandfather worked here before he was born. (Photo by Ken Beck.)

On a typical morning, Cletus Spivey works with gusto in the kitchen making chocolate twists and cinnamon rolls. The Cookeville native clocks in between 1 and 2 a.m. and hits the ground running.

Spivey and his family have seen a lot of donuts come and go, too.

“I’m a third-generation employee,” he said. “My mama [Michelle] worked her for 32 years, and my grandfather Harry worked here before I was born.”

Dana Garrett of Bloomington Springs provides another veteran hand in the shop.

“I worked here 15 years ago for Ralph and then went to work at the car wash. Every time Cynthia came by she said, ‘Come back and work for us.’ I’ve been back about six months now.”

In her estimation, the old-fashion buttermilk donut is “the best by far,” she says. “I eat about two a day.”

The shop might be compared to the “Cheers” bar from the famed TV series, except Ralph’s regulars are hooked on donuts and coffee rather than beer and pretzels.

About the early morning crowd, Mark said, “We have a lot of old guys cutting up, aggravating everybody. We try to have fun with the customers. The older customers are like family. I’ve got a lot of their phone numbers, and if one of them doesn’t come in after a few days, I call them.”

Mark said his favorite moments at work are when the youngsters come in. “When they look at that showcase and see sprinkled donuts, they just light up,” he said.

Meanwhile, some of his most loyal customers make pilgrimages to the shop from many miles and even many states away.

“I’ve got one lady who comes from Knoxville once a month and gets 14 dozen that she takes back to her office. And there’s a lady from New Hampshire who comes every Christmas. Last time she brought me maple syrup. She wants me to open a shop in New Hampshire,” said Mark, who has no plans to make donuts in New England.

Dallas Frazier, Ralph’s right-hand man across five decades, provides some final words. He
stops by the shop every now and then and admits, “Oh, yeah, I eat a donut, but I don’t pay for anything.”

Asked what made Ralph’s Donut Shop such a popular place, he answered, “It’s got to be the merchandise. If you make something bad, people are not gonna buy it, but if you got something that’s good, people will keep coming back. They do make a good donut.”

Press Release from the State of Tennessee, Sept. 5, 2019:

Registration through September 8 for September 14-19 event

NASHVILLE – More than 275 cyclists from nearly 30 states will gather at Natchez Trace State Park and Montgomery Bell State Park on Sept. 14-19 for Tennessee State Parks’ annual Bicycle Ride Across Tennessee.

The 30th annual ride will guide riders through some of Tennessee’s most scenic and charming communities, including Huntingdon, Lexington, Parsons, Charlotte, and Kingston Springs.

Each day will feature out-and-back rides returning to stay overnight at Natchez Trace State Park and Montgomery Bell State Park. Riders will pass key attractions along the way including Mousetail Landing State Park, the historic Charlotte Courthouse Square, and Brown Creek Lake.

In addition to the ride, interpretive programs are held nightly that allow riders to explore the parks and learn skills from park rangers. Programs this year include a historic van tour of Montgomery Bell State Park, an introduction to primitive weapons, a birds of prey program, and more.

The ride is non-competitive and suitable for a range of skill levels. Riders can register for a one-, two-, three- or six-day ride through Sept. 8. Registration begins at $99 for a one-day trip and $599 for the full 331-mile trip. The fee includes a fully supported route, lodging at two state park campsites, hot showers, meals (breakfast and supper), live entertainment and interpretive programming as well as an event T-shirt. Cabin and RV campground lodging is also available for an additional fee.

The Bicycle Ride Across Tennessee is sponsored by Tennessee State Parks and benefits The Friends of Montgomery Bell State Park, The Friends of Natchez Trace State Park, The Friends of the Cumberland Trail, and the Tennessee State Park Rangers Association.

More information on the ride, including a map of the route and registration instructions, can be found at www.thebrat.org.

Press Release from the Office of Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury, Justin P. Wilson, Aug. 29, 2019:

Link: https://comptroller.tn.gov/office-functions/investigations/find.html

The Tennessee Comptroller’s Office, working in close cooperation with Middle Tennessee State University Audit and Consulting Services, has completed an investigation of questionable activity within the MTSU Athletic Department.

The investigation began after Athletic Department officials first detected potential problems.

Investigators determined that a former associate athletic director charged $3,500 to his university purchasing card to buy 100 copies of “A Guide to Etiquette for Student Athletes.” At the time of the purchase, the associate athletic director was listed as one of two incorporators of the company that produced the guide, and he was identified on the corporate website as the chief operating officer.

The former associate athletic director told investigators he purchased the etiquette guides for the football team and denied any association with the company. Although more than half of the football team recalled receiving an etiquette guide, the athletic director, football coach, and director of football operations told investigators they did not know about this purchase.

Athletic department officials could not determine whether the purchase of the etiquette guide was in the Athletic Department’s best interest.

Additionally, investigators found that MTSU Athletic Department staff used the university’s purchase credit with a sports and fitness company to obtain at least $34,084 in athletic shoes and sports apparel for friends and family.

MTSU had a contract with a sports and fitness company that provided a specified amount of retail purchase credit that enabled coaches and athletic staff to obtain free apparel and other items. The contract stated the free products and apparel were “for use by (or in connection with) the Covered [athletic] Programs, clinics, camps, Coaches, Staff and such other purposes as UNIVERSITY and/or Director of Athletics may deem appropriate.”

The Athletic Department neither monitored nor tracked purchase credit orders to determine if they were made in accordance with the contract terms, or the university’s acceptable use practices.

The results of this investigation have been communicated with the Office of the District Attorney General of the 16th Judicial District.

MTSU officials have indicated they are establishing new practices and procedures to correct these issues.

To view the investigative report, go to: https://comptroller.tn.gov/office-functions/investigations/find.html

The Tennessee House of Representatives on Friday formally selected a new speaker to replace Glen Casada, a Williamson County Republican who stepped down earlier this year in wake of a scandal.

Cameron Sexton, a Republican from Crossville, was elected to preside over the 99-member body for the remainder of its current session, which ends next year.

Sexton won the post on a 94-0 vote. Two Democrats, Gloria Johnson of Knoxville and Bo Mitchell of Nashville, abstained.

Sexton’s first speech after taking the oath of office to assume the House’s top lawmaker position focused on Tennesseans “answering the call.”

He made reference to Tennessee “volunteers” at the War of 1812, the Alamo, as well as those who pushed ratification of women’s suffrage and others who helped revive the city of Memphis after Yellow Fever epidemics decimated the population in the 19th century.

“Today we are here to answer our call — a call to work together to the betterment of Tennessee, and our people,” Sexton told the lawmakers gathered on the chamber floor for the one-day special session called specifically to replace Casada. “Our call is to leave our great state in better shape than when we first arrived.”

“When we look back on our service in this historic body, we all want to be remembered for the successes and accomplishments,” he continued. “If we are going to dwell, let’s dwell on the good, on our future, and the Tennesseans who have always answered the call before us.”

Sexton lauded the state’s job growth and low unemployment of late, and pledged to protect Tennessee’s status as “the most fiscally responsible state in the union.”

He also promised to work amicably with the GOP-dominated Senate and Republican Gov. Bill Lee’s executive branch.

He added, though, that maintaining legislative independence is an important aspect of the House’s business. “Preserving our individualism as a separate branch is what our founders requested us to do,” Sexton said.

Sexton also vowed that under his leadership, minority viewpoints won’t be suppressed. He observed that while members of the Legislature often disagree on the best methods for achieving public policy goals, they tend to share priorities.

“We all want great schools, great jobs, great infrastructure and great health care,” he said. “The challenge is, we will not always agree on the pathway to get there. But together we will get there.”

Sexton said he’ll “always encourage robust but respectful debate on the pathways to the shared goals of all Tennesseans.”

“My promise as speaker is simple: we won’t always agree on every issue, but I will always make sure that your voice is heard,” he added.

Tennessee Republicans currently outnumber Democrats 72-26 in the House. As in the Senate, the GOP enjoys a supermajority and with it overwhelming agenda-setting dominance.

Former House Speaker Casada resigned earlier this month as a result of a scandal involving salacious texts he’d exchanged with his chief of staff. Although still a member of the General Assembly, Casada was not present at the special session Friday.

State officials say they’ve addressed concerns and issues that may have played a role in a child’s drowning this spring, and they’re ready to reopen the scenic waterfall swimming hole along the Blackburn Fork River in Jackson County.

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation issued a press release Tuesday outlining changes to safety policies at Cummins Falls State Park, where earlier this year a 2-year-old boy was swept away to his death during a June 8 flash flood.

TDEC reports that a weather scanning station has been established and will enable rangers to “monitor watershed-specific radar during park operating hours.”

“Park staff will evacuate the gorge when radar indicates rain anywhere in the watershed, not just the park itself,” Bryson said. “This is the most conservative and appropriate protocol at this time.”

River monitoring gauges are also now in place upstream from the falls. They will measure water levels and send electronic communication alerts to park officials and regional rescue teams in the event that waters rapidly rise, according to TDEC’s Aug. 13 news release, which is posted below:

TDEC Implements Comprehensive Safety Improvement Strategy at Cummins Falls State Park

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation has implemented a comprehensive safety improvement strategy at Cummins Falls State Park and will reopen the falls and gorge on Aug. 14 if weather conditions permit.

The additions will include new policies for minors, additional signage, additional safety-related information on the Cummins Falls State Park webpage, a safety education video for public viewing at the park, real-time weather monitoring, water monitoring, refuge areas in case of an evacuation and increased personnel.

“We are glad to be in a position to reopen Cummins Falls with added enhanced safety tools and procedures that we are putting into place,” TDEC Deputy Commissioner Jim Bryson said. “This area is an extremely rugged area in a dynamic watershed that will never be completely risk free, and the best way to enhance safety is to take a comprehensive approach, and in this case that means new policies, educational tools and wet-weather protocols for our visitors.”

Three new policies are being added regarding access to the gorge and falls:

  • Each child 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult.
  • Each child 12 and under must have a life jacket.
  • Each child 12 and under must wear the life jacket when swimming.

TDEC also encourages children ages five and under to not enter the falls and gorge areas.

Signage at the trailhead and in the gorge area in English and Spanish will warn of the dangers of flash flooding and provide instructions in the event of a flood. The Cummins Falls State Park webpage will include an informative pop-up that will alert prospective visitors to the potential dangers and strenuous nature of the falls and the hike into the falls. A temporary visitor center has been erected over the trail leading to the falls. It is equipped with two 70-inch monitors playing a safety video on loop as visitors prepare to enter the trail.

A weather monitoring station at the park now serves as the central hub for weather monitoring efforts. Located adjacent to the trailhead, park staff will monitor watershed-specific radar during park operating hours.

“Park staff will evacuate the gorge when radar indicates rain anywhere in the watershed, not just the park itself,” Bryson said. “This is the most conservative and appropriate protocol at this time.”

In coordination with Tennessee Tech University, three river monitoring gauges have been installed on tributaries upstream from the falls to measure water levels. These gauges will send texts and email alerts to all Cummins Falls park staff when water levels rise significantly. The alerts will also be sent to two local 911 emergency response centers.

The monitoring gauges have been installed and TDEC has been reviewing the data to better understand the dynamics of the watershed. The system will become predictive over time, but more data is needed.

“At this time, we are not comfortable with the monitoring data itself being the first mechanism to warn visitors of an influx of water into the gorge,” Bryson said. “We will use the data we are collecting as a secondary layer of safety until the system becomes more predictive.”

If the park is evacuated, three refuge areas located above all known flood levels have been cleared of brush and clearly marked. These areas provide easy access to high ground where visitors can seek refuge until they are evacuated or the water recedes.

The park is adding at least two seasonal employees to assist with managing crowds at the park and assist with weather monitoring, visitor education and visitor safety.

“I am pleased with the comprehensive approach and due diligence TDEC has put in to make the park safer for our citizens,” State Rep. Ryan Williams, R-Cookeville, said. “Cummins Falls is a world-class recreational destination, but safety will continue to be top priority.”

“We asked TDEC to step up its game in terms of safety at Cummins Falls, and they have delivered,” State Sen. Paul Bailey, R-Sparta, said. “I encourage anyone in my district who visits Cummins Falls to please review all safety information provided and take guidance from park rangers very seriously.”

“TDEC has taken several additional measures to enhance safety at Cummins Falls,” State Rep. John Mark Windle, D-Livingston, said. “Cummins Falls is a beautiful place, but people should continue to put safety first when they visit.”

162 reasons to swing through TN’s ‘Golf Capital’

Beware: Bogeyman-haunted traps lurk fore-biddingly about the greens in Cumberland County. But really that just makes for even more good reasons link up with friends or family and set a course toward the “Golf Capital of Tennessee” as the summer days chip away into fall.

Cumberland County didn’t earn that distinctive nickname for nothing. The nine challenging courses — that’s a total of 162 holes — will test your metal (and wood) against some of the finest, not-so-faraway fairways the Volunteer State has to offer.

Magnificent panoramic views are par for the course in Cumberland County. The spectacular 14th hole at Druid Hills, where on a clear day you can see 40 miles, is but one extraordinary example.

Nestled alluringly amidst the Cumberland Plateau’s lovely scramble of hills, cliffs, crags, forests, valleys and water hazards, Crossville lies about 110 miles east of Nashville. The county seat of Cumberland County, it is just 70 miles west of Knoxville, and less than an hour’s drive from Cookeville.

“Being named the ‘Golf Capital of Tennessee’ was not a case of local officials looking for a catchy moniker,” the Crossville Chamber of Commerce website assures visitors. More than half a million rounds of golf are played in Cumberland County each year, and the number keeps driving higher all the time.

Jeff Houston, director of golf at Fairfield Glade, estimates that somewhere between 175,000 to 190,000 rounds are teed up yearly at the popular retirement-and-resort hamlet 20 miles northeast of Crossville.

Cumberland County lays claim to its title due to the number of courses and their indisputable beauty — combined with the “amount of play during the season,” said Houston. There are five courses at Fairfield Glade alone, and two more in the county, plus another two within Crossville’s city limits, he said.

Many golf-enthusiasts from Middle Tennessee and beyond make yearly pilgrimages to Cumberland County. Goodlettsville’s Lisa Moore has been making an annual trek with three of her golfing girlfriends since 1995.

“We like going to Crossville because it’s close and convenient, and it’s just beautiful up there,” she said. “You kind of get the feeling you’re going home or to a favorite place where you can relax and unwind, and the people who work at the courses you see year after year and are kind of like old friends. They’re very nice and very accommodating.”

Below is a list of area golf destinations and a little background about what makes each course special. For more details about golf in Crossville, call 1-877-GOLF-TN1 or go online to: golfcapitaltenn.com.

Hole 13’s green at Dorchester fits neatly into a majestic hardwood-pine forest.

Dorchester Golf Club at Fairfield Glade
576 Westchester Drive, Crossville
Phone: (931) 484-3709
Website: https://fairfieldglade.net/fairfield-amenities/ (click on golf)

  • Head Pro: Jack Sixkiller, 22 years
  • Year Opened: 1977
  • Yardage from White Tees: 5,817
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: “By today’s standards the course is not long, but the bentgrass greens, narrow tree-lined fairways, strategically placed bunkers and water on six of the 18 golf holes makes Dorchester Golf Club a challenge for even the skilled golfer.” – Jeff Houston, Fairfield Glade golf director for 28 years.

Signature Hole: A par three that plays 30 yards downhill as it drops from tee to pin, lucky Hole 13‘s green is cut out of forest to give a dramatic effect. A creek that borders the rear of the green complex adds further intrigue.

Druid Hills Golf Club at Fairfield Glade
435 Lakeview Drive, Crossville
Phone: (931) 484-3711
Website: https://fairfieldglade.net/fairfield-amenities/ (click on golf)

  • Head Pro: Rag Jones, 17 years
  • Year Opened: 1970
  • Yardage White Tees: 5,827 yards
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: Located on the highest point in Fairfield Glade, Druid Hills provides several 360-degree scenic views of the surrounding mountains.

Signature Hole: A spectacular east-facing vista (where on a clear day you can see 40 miles) added to a beckoning green guarded by a natural rock waterfall makes Hole 14 an unforgettable par 5.

Heatherhurst Golf Club: The Brae Course at Fairfield Glade
Phone: 421 Stonehenge Drive, Crossville
(931) 484-3799
Website: https://fairfieldglade.net/fairfield-amenities/ (click on golf)

Lake Dartmoor’s smooth waters can be rough on wayward approach shots at The Brae’s 10th hole.

  • Head Pro: Jeremy Jones, 14 years
  • Year Opened: Heatherhurst opened in stages. The Brae Course debuted the Mountain Nine in 1988 and the Creek Nine in 1991. The opening date of the Brae Course and Crag Course as a 36-hole facility was May 27, 2000.
  • Yardage from White Tees: 5,980
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: On the front nine, Heatherhurst Brae features a double dogleg par 5 said to be one of the toughest in Tennessee, and the back nine offers three par 3s, three par 4s and three par 5s with undulating fairways and encroaching bunkers.

Signature Hole: Heatherhurst Brae’s Hole 10 is a long par 5 that plays downhill all the way to the green, and Lake Dartmoor will scuttle errant approach shots to the right and rear.

Don’t let the The Crag’s 14th hole beauty distract you because a precision shot is required on the drive.

Heatherhurst Golf Club: The Crag Course at Fairfield Glade
421 Stonehenge Drive, Crossville
(931) 484-3799
Website: fhttps://fairfieldglade.net/fairfield-amenities/ (click on golf)

  • Head Pro: Jeremy Jones, 14 years
  • Year Opened: Heatherhurst opened in stages. The Crag Course debuted the Pine Nine in 1989 and the New Nine in 2000.
  • Yardage from White Tees: 5,564
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: Heatherhurst Crag is player-friendly with tee locations ranging from the most forward tee at 3,600 to the blue tees at 6,200. Bentgrass tees and greens, wide fairways make it great for short hitters and strategically placed bunkers add to the fun.

Signature Hole: If the view doesn’t get you the Hole 17 tee shot will: a short par 4 that offers a dramatic first shot that plays downhill onto a narrow fairway. With Dogwood Branch bordering the left of the fairway and a huge bank and out of bounds guarding the right, a precise drive is required.

Stonehenge’s 14th hole is encircled with score-imperiling splendor.

Stonehenge Golf Course at Fairfield Glade
222 Fairfield Boulevard, Crossville
Phone: (931) 484-3731
Website: https://fairfieldglade.net/fairfield-amenities/ (click on golf)

  • Head Pro: Corey Wade, 10 years
  • Year Opened: 1985
  • Yardage from White Tees: 6,202
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: Stonehenge is proud to feature bentgrass tees, fairways and greens. Natural rock outcroppings come into play on several holes, with a 15-foot layered stone retaining wall running along the left and rear of the downhill par 3 14th hole.

Signature Hole: A dramatic drop from the tee to the green makes Hole 14 a must-see par 3. Lake Dartmoor awaits in the back for a breath-taking view.

Lake Tansi Golf Course
2476 Dunbar Road, Crossville
931-788-3301
Website: www.laketansigolf.com

  • Head Pro: Gavin Darbyshire, 1 year

    Lake Tansi’s 18th hole is a strong finisher.

  • Year Opened: 1958
  • Yardage from White Tees: 6,205
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: Exceptionally pleasant course for a variety of golfers. It provides a very good challenge for better players from the back tees (6,701 yards) and is still very enjoyable and manageable for mid to high handicap golfers from more forward tees.

Signature Hole: The best is saved for last at Lake Tansi. Hole 18 is a par 5 playing slightly uphill and measuring 592 yards from the back tee. The generous fairway bends from right to left along a hillside as it wraps around Lake Hiawatha. The elevated green, which also slopes toward the lake, presents a challenging finishing target.

Bear Trace at Cumberland Mountain
407 Wild Plum Lane, Crossville
Phone: (931) 707-1640
Website: tnstateparks.com/golf/course/bear-trace-at-cumberland-mountain

  • Head Pro: Kelvin Burgin, 6 years
  • Year Opened: 1998
  • Yardage from White Tees: 5,916
  • Unique/ Outstanding Feature: “The golf course has no homes on it. It’s just you and nature,” says Burgin.

Signature Hole: 7.

Cumberland Cove in Monterey
Owner Sam Hicks
16941 Highway 70 N., Monterey
931-839-3313
Website: facebook.com/cumberlandcove/

River Run Golf Club
1701 Tennessee Ave., Crossville
931-456-4060
Website: facebook.com/RiverRunGolfClub/

Features of the River Run course include its signature Par 3 island green, and it has the longest and shortest holes in Cumberland County.

Press Release from the State of Tennessee, August 2, 2019:

Link: https://www.tn.gov/twra/news/2019/8/2/twra-leasing-fields-for-2019-dove-season.html

NASHVILLE — The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is seeking fields to lease for the upcoming 2019 dove season. The first segment of dove season opens at noon on Sunday, Sept. 1.

Mourning doves are a popular game bird and one of the most widely distributed and abundant birds in North America. More mourning doves are harvested than all other migratory bird species combined in 39 of the continental states. In Tennessee, an estimated 19,000 hunters harvested approximately 334,000 mourning doves last year.

Landowners can earn up to $3,600 for providing a dove field for public hunting. These fields must be available for a minimum of three priority hunt dates in September.

TWRA began its leased dove field program in the late 1980s and the program has been very successful in providing quality hunting opportunities for hunters. In addition to leased fields, many public dove fields are provided on wildlife management areas in each TWRA region. The TWRA website will have specific information about WMAs and leased dove fields in each region beginning Aug. 15.

The standard fall leased field is a harvested grain field to which TWRA leases the hunting rights for three priority dates. The hunting access rate paid to landowners for fall leased fields may be up to $75 per acre for a maximum of 40 acres. Fields that are top sown with wheat are eligible for an additional $15 per acre. Interested landowners must sign up their fields in August.

Anyone interested in leasing a dove field to TWRA should contact their TWRA regional office. The TWRA has four regional offices across the state that interested landowners can contact: Region I (West Tennessee) 731-423-5725 or toll free 800-372-3928; Region II (Middle Tennessee) 615-781-6622 or toll free 800-624-7406; Region III (Upper Cumberland) 931-484-9571 or toll free 833-402-4698; Region IV (East Tennessee) 423-587-7037 or 800-332-0900.

Crossville Republican Cameron Sexton has been nominated by the GOP caucus of the Tennessee House of Representatives to serve as the chamber’s highest ranking officer.

State Rep. Cameron Sexton, R-Crossville

The House’s supermajority-strong Republican bloc met in Nashville Wednesday to select a replacement for Glen Casada, who is stepping down as a result of a sex, drugs and racism texting scandal involving his former chief of staff. Casada will resign at the end of this week.

The 48-year-old Sexton currently serves as the GOP caucus chairman. He beat out five other lawmakers seeking the speakership nomination, including Ryan Williams of Cookeville.

Because Republicans vastly outnumber Democrats in the House, Sexton is virtually guaranteed to win the speakership vote when the full chamber convenes in special session next month.

 

 

Jonesborough, Tenn. — The former East Tennessee State University student accused of violating Black Lives Matter protesters’ civil rights during one of their campus demonstrations three years ago has been found not guilty of the most serious charges he faced.

Twenty-one year old Tristan Rettke, who grew up in Middle Tennessee and now attends college out of state, was acquitted in Washington County Criminal Court Wednesday afternoon of two counts of civil rights intimidation and two counts of disorderly conduct stemming from an incident in 2016 when he showed up at the BLM protest wearing a gorilla mask and handing out bananas to a cluster of African American students taking part in the demonstration.

Tristan Rettke (left) and his attorney, Patrick Denton.

Rettke was convicted however on a misdemeanor charge of interrupting a meeting or procession. The BLM students had reserved a spot outside the ETSU campus library prior to their protest.

Rettke’s defense lawyer, Patrick Denton, who is originally from Cookeville, expressed disappointment his client wasn’t fully exonerated and said an appeal may be forthcoming.

However, he hailed the jury’s verdict on the civil rights violations — both felonies carrying two-to-four year state prison sentences — as a “vindication for the First Amendment.”

“I am a First Amendment absolutist, so this trial meant something to me,” Denton told reporters after the verdict was delivered. From the outset of the case Denton said he was certain the district attorney general’s office was misapplying the civil rights intimidation statute by suggesting Rettke was trying to silence the protesters through coercion or threats.

In fact, said Denton, if anyone’s guilty of attempting to intimidate a person from exercising their free-speech rights it is the prosecuting attorneys in the case, and Rettke is the victim.

“I could never quite get the state to see the irony in that,” Denton said.

Rettke left the building without comment.

Erin McArdle, the lead prosecutor, said she wasn’t entirely surprised by the verdict because she found it difficult to anticipate what the outcome would be. “This case was one of those that I couldn’t predict anything from the very beginning,” she said, adding that a hung jury had seemed the most likely to her.

Despite the jury’s repudiation of prosecution arguments that Rettke’s actions fit a legal definition of intimidation, McArdle said the type of behavior he displayed “won’t be tolerated” in the future.

McArdle said she stands by her decision to prosecute Rettke on felony charges in spite of the jury verdict.