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PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OFFICE OF TENNESSEE COMPTROLLER JUSTIN P. WILSON, SEPTEMBER 6, 2018:

The Tennessee Comptroller’s Office has launched a much-anticipated online tool that makes it easy to see how land is being used across the state of Tennessee.

The Comptroller’s Land Use Model (LUM) will be a valuable resource for people working in economic and community development, urban planning, transportation development, and more.

The online maps allow users to quickly see how each parcel of land within a city or county is currently being utilized.

Each property is color-coded and classified with categories such as single and multi-family dwellings, office spaces, general commercial uses, industrial sites, and agricultural timber lands.

The LUM originated in the former Local Planning Assistance Office of the state’s Department of Economic and Community Development (ECD). Since the closure of ECD’s planning division in 2011, the LUM has not been produced. The Comptroller’s Office has now redeveloped and improved this tool using data from the 84 counties on Tennessee’s IMPACT computer-assisted mass appraisal system.

“This data will be very useful for anyone who wants to analyze how land is being utilized across the state,” said Comptroller Justin P. Wilson. “We are pleased to offer this tool to each of the counties who use the IMPACT system. We believe the land use model will fill a gap in the planning and economic development community.”

The Comptroller’s Office will update the county land use maps semi-annually. Users can access maps in PDF form or with GIS software.

To access the Land Use Model, go to: http://www.comptroller.tn.gov/lg/LandUseMain.asp

Press release from the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Sept. 6, 2017:

More than Pumpkins to Pick on Local Farms This Fall

NASHVILLE– A trip to the pumpkin patch has become standard fare for autumn loving locals, and this year it’s worth looking around for more than great gourds. Many farmers are expanding options for consumers to learn how and where food and home goods are grown or made.

Bountiful Acres Farm near Watertown produces a wide range of personal care products, and found that customers also wanted to learn how to make their own. Owner Sue Dickhaus added a retail store in Lebanon where she hosts soap making classes using the same goat’s milk, honey bee products and herbs her family produces on the farm.

In addition to dairy and creamery tours, Noble Springs Dairy near Franklin hosts farm festivals every Saturday from September 16 through October 28. Their celebrations include pumpkin picking, food trucks at their picnic area, a bounce house and petting zoo.

Greeneville’s Two Roots Vineyard and Alpacas hosts a National Alpacas Farm Days festival September 24 and 25. Visitors can try spinning and weaving in addition to touring the vineyard, picnicking and mingling with the farm’s alpacas.

Most agritourism farms, like Falcon Ridge near Jackson, still offer farm favorites like wagon rides, petting zoos, pony rides, all kinds of fall décor, and pumpkin picking. Family movie nights in the pumpkin patch, praise and worship opportunities for area congregations, and educational corn mazes are also popular fall fare. The Plantation Barn of 1810 in Morristown is a popular wedding venue, and this year plans to host a community wide “trunk or treat” for the first time.

Find fall farm activities and products with the Pick Tennessee mobile app or here. Most on-farm activities depend on good weather, so call ahead and check the farm’s social media posts before traveling.

Pick Tennessee is the farmer to consumer service of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture and offers farm, farmers market, and farm product directories as well as seasonal recipes. Follow Pick Tennessee on social media.